Growing up in the 70's and 80's we were told that computers were the wave of the future and would probably replace many things in our daily lives, to include jobs.

Because of technology and advancements in the digital world, our friends at kiplinger.com have brought to light some of the things that may go away in the near future.

Here are 7 things that we may soon see go 'bye-bye' in the Pine Tree State.

 

 

 

  • 1

    Keys To The House

    Brass keys cut to a certain shape are going by the wayside. Of course, if you grew up in Maine, you may have never had a key to the front door. Keyless entry is already big at many companies and will probably come to a home near you.

    Gary Freeman, Townsquare Media
  • 2

    Fast Food Jobs

    Once the $15 an hour for 'burger-flippin' employees came about, we all knew it was a matter of time before they would be going away. Food joints such as, but not limited to, Panera are kicking up their touch screen orders, which means no more people taking orders. So much for $15 bucks an hour, eh?

    Justin Sullivan, Getty Images
  • 3

    Clutch Pedals

    If you're a traditional stick shift driver, then hang on to those oldies, but goodies. A report came out that more and more vehicles are not offering the standard transmissions anymore, to include the F-150. Takes the fun out of driving, especially in the County.

    Gary Freeman, Getty Images
  • 4

    College Text Books

    Word is out that by the end of this decade, 2020 or thereabouts, textbooks will be long gone! Thanks to the digital markets upper their products, you can expect to pay and read your material online, rather than old school textbooks. Which means no more wrapping your textbooks in brown paper bags!

    Thinkstock
  • 5

    The Old Plow

    Have you every had your field plowed? Well, that may be coming to an end pretty soon. If you are a modern day farmer, then you probably know that turning the soil is becoming a thing of the past. Low-till or No-till seems to be the way farmers are planting crops these days, for many different reasons. Erosion being one of them.

    Raymond Kleboe, Getty Images
  • 6

    The Blue Mail Box

    People sending 'snail mail' has gone down 57-percent from 2004 to 2015. Can we read the writing on the wall? Or shall we say, 'the mailbox?' The cost of fuel and time are costing the post office lots of money. Those blue mailboxes around the country have been cut in half since the 1980's.

    Joe Raedle, Getty Images
  • 7

    Incandescent Light Bulbs